An Interview With Jamie from Jamie’s Tarantulas (Including a Sneak Peek at her Black Friday Sale)

Dealer Jamies

jamie-handlingAnyone who has read my blog knows that one of my favorite places to shop for Ts has been Jamie’s Tarantulas. Carrying an excellent and ever-changing selection of species, Jamie’s is also one of the few dealers where you can pick up a spider, an enclosure, and feeder insects all in one stop. Combine this convenience with great prices, excellent service, and some of the least expensive shipping with a LAG guarantee on the web, and you have the makings for a top tarantula dealer. Even better, Jamie is incredibly friendly and approachable and always willing to offer help or advice to those new to the tarantula keeping. She was definitely a huge help to me when I first got hooked on the hobby.

Considering that a good chunk of my collection was purchased from Jamie’s, I thought it would be fun to find out a little about the folks behind this wonderful business. Jamie was nice enough to take time out of her busy schedule to chat with me about tarantulas.

First off, I know you are quite busy, so thanks so much for taking the time to chat.

Thank you, Tom, for taking the time to arrange this interview.  Many might not know it, but Tom has contributed many fantastic ideas and feedback to help us better Jamie’s Tarantulas.  An example: Tom suggested we somehow distinguish tarantulas suitable for beginners from the rest we have available for purchase.  This makes choosing the right tarantula much easier for novice tarantula keepers.  Please don’t stop sending the great ideas our way!  

It’s my pleasure! And I think it’s AWESOME that you added that section. I’ve already spoken to some folks new to the hobby that really appreciate that you’ve got a designated heading for them.

So, let’s start with a little background: how did you first become interested in tarantulas? Which was the first species you ever kept?

Ever since I was a child I’ve been interested in “bugs”. As long as I can remember, my desk and dresser were always covered in various jars and containers with a variety of specimens. Of course, they were released after observation so new specimens could be found and observed. I once horrified my first grade teacher when she discovered the reason why I was so distracted; a pocket full of beetles was definitely not what she was expecting.

Many years ago, I was getting food for a gargoyle gecko when something blue caught my eye. One of the store employees was holding a juvenile versicolor. I was taken by the delicate way in which it moved; it almost “marched” with rhythm. I had to take it home and, well, you know what they say; Tarantulas are like potato chips…you can’t have just one.

Like chips and tattoos! I think many in the hobby can relate to the addictiveness. And I know that folks often speak of that first time they saw a tarantula in person as a huge moment for them.

So, what got you started in breeding? That’s a step above collecting and an aspect of the hobby many are fascinated by. What was your first breeding project?

After my first tarantula, I immediately began adding to my collection. Any Avicularia species I found for sale and could afford that wasn’t currently part of my collection, I purchased. My favorite was an adult female A. versicolor. While on my hunt to add to my collection, I came across a mature male A. versicolor for sale. I immediately contacted the seller to purchase him. Later that week an enthusiastic bachelor arrived in the mail.

In the time between the mature male’s purchase and arrival, every second I could afford was spent doing research. I took notes on all the information I could find regarding keeping and breeding Avicularia and useful tips and tricks for tarantulas in general. At that time, the information was limited; for every question answered it felt I had two more to ask. The Tarantula Keeper’s Guide by Stan Schultz, or the 376 page “Tarantula Bible” as it’s known by some due to it being the definitive word on tarantulas, was a huge help. The book covers taxonomy, history, husbandry and, of course, breeding. There are 36 pages on the topic of breeding alone! Anyone interested in tarantulas, whether it be for interest, keeping or breeding, should seriously consider purchasing a copy.

I designed custom cages based on designs found on the internet and in the Keeper’s guide. My handy father offered to help. I found fish tanks of the preferred dimensions, and I designed and built a shelf to house them. The cages were fitted with custom acrylic lids. The custom racks were set up and the females rehoused into their permanent digs. Being very motivated to start my breeding project, and thanks to my father’s effort and experience, the project was completed in a weekend.

The A. versicolor was given some time to settle into her new enclosure before the male was introduced. I was nervous (although likely not as nervous as the enthusiastic bachelor). Within seconds of placing him in the females enclosure he began to drum. She answered him immediately! I watched anxiously and they came closer and closer together. They touched gently then he went straight to business. After two or three minutes of hot spider sex, he set her down and walked to the edge of her enclosure and proceeded to groom.

The next few months were a waiting game. I fed her as often as she would eat and she quickly put on weight. She began to web more and more heavily and eventually wouldn’t come out of her web. Days turned to weeks. What was she doing? Is she OK? I resisted the urge to disturb her and then one morning I saw it. She was holding what looked like a big cotton ball. Success!

The date was carefully recorded and the waiting began. Once I was certain the spiderlings were first instar, the egg sac was pulled and the slings moved into a homemade incubator. They began to darken and molt. I sat for hours and watched the spiderlings molt into second instars.

That’s a fantastic story. I’m sure many folks out there who have bred or tried to breed their specimens can appreciate the nervousness you felt when you first introduced the male, as well as the anticipation of waiting to see if the paring was successful. And I can’t help but to be incredibly impressed over the fact that you didn’t just research and buy the spiders, but built your own enclosures and shelving as well. You certainly went all in.

How did you eventually transition from a hobbyist to dealer of tarantulas? How and when did Jamie’s Tarantulas come about?

thumbnail_versi-sac-open

Avicularia  versicolor sac

During the time I was waiting for my first A. versicolor female to lay an egg sac I bred many other species and soon after the A. versicolors molted to second instar came a successful hatch of A. urticans and A. azuraklaasi. A. diversipes hatched successfully soon thereafter. I did not need to keep all of the slings hatched. I picked twenty or so to grow out from each clutch and began advertising the rest for sale or trade. At that time, I had already built a variety of custom enclosures for my own needs and customers were asking to buy them. Most of my transactions were originally done in person or via email or forum. I had always dreamed of having my own website and believed it would be an efficient format for selling my spiderlings and enclosures.

While in college for Marketing, I learned how to set up a basic e-commerce website. I thought a website would not only streamline the ordering process for both the merchant and customer, but it would also present all my shipping/LAG and care information in a format easy for customers to navigate. After a few transactions, I noticed many of the questions I received were similar, questions I asked when I first came into the hobby. I wrote care sheets and an FAQ to address common questions and concerns. As the orders went out just as many new tarantulas came in. Tarantulas became an obsession. It seemed there were never enough funds to cover the cost of purchasing those on my wish-list. In order to compensate for this, I actively sought out others who’d hatched egg sacs to trade and to expand my collection. Selling and trading ‘slings allowed me to quickly expand my inventory. The larger inventory increased sales, nearly all of the proceeds of which were spent on more tarantulas and… so it began.

I can definitely appreciate how expensive fulfilling tarantula wishlists can be. Sounds like transitioning to a dealer was the perfect way to finance what can be an expensive hobby! Are there any breeding projects you’re currently working on that you are particularly excited about that you would like to share?

Breeding projects so far this season include A. versicolor, A. metallica, B. smithi, B. emilia, B. auratum, B. albiceps, B. albopilosum, G. pulchripes, G. pulchra, Euathlus Red and L. parahybana.

We recently paired a B. klaasi female who has been steadily gaining weight. Out of all my breeding projects so far this year, I’m most excited for this one. 

We’re looking for males of any species we’re breeding regardless if we have males already. The more diverse the genetics the better. Thank you to all our customers who’ve sent us their males. Without you we wouldn’t be able to offer such a variety of captive-bred slings.

We have many other breeding projects in the works we hope to announce soon.

Which species, in your opinion, has been the easiest to breed? How about the most challenging?

This is a bit of a difficult question, as I think everyone would have their own answer. There are some species that, for whatever reason, seem difficult to breed while others seem more forgiving to mistakes in husbandry and more likely to produce in a variety of conditions. Under many circumstances, the species someone’s familiar with and able to keep happy and healthy is a good candidate. I would imagine choosing a species whose native habitat/climate is similar to the native climate of the keeper, or is one the keeper is able to accurately imitate, would make breeding certain species easier.

That’s a fantastic point about breeding experiences differing dependent on local climate. I live in New England, where the summers are hot and humid and the winters cold and dry, so I would have to put in a bit more effort to get the ideal conditions for some tropical species. On the other hand, someone from warmer climes would likely have an easier time. So, which are the species you find easiest?

My personal “easiest” would probably be the more hardy Avicularia such as avicularia, urticans and metallica. A. avicularia and A. metallica have a wide natural range which may contribute to their hardiness. Recently, a customer sent me a picture of an A. aviculara adult female crammed into an 8oz deli cup clutching what appeared a bright white ball of webbing. It was thought to be an egg sac, so the customer purchased the A. avicularia from the pet store and took her home. The photo was taken and sent to me for verification. I had never seen anything like that before and was delighted to hear from the owner two weeks later the egg sac hatched out a couple dozen healthy slings. What a mom!

Wow, I can’t help but to be a bit jealous! Nothing like a buy one, get 24 free deal. That’s fantastic.

One of the great aspects of your business that is often brought up in reviews is that folks can find both the tarantulas and the enclosures at Jamie’s Tarantulas. People really love that convenience. How did you guys first get into the acrylic cage design and manufacturing end of things?

cages-oneOur enclosures were originally conceived with no intent or interest to resell. The only reason we made the original “Jamie’s Tarantula Enclosure” is we could not find anyone who produced the enclosure we wanted to put our beloved tarantulas in. At the time my collection was mostly Avicularia sp. We wanted good ventilation while maintaining humidity. Misting without having to open the cage was a huge advantage when keeping the Avics. It was also necessary that the enclosure opened from the middle or bottom as to not to disturb Avicularia’s web.

After many months of research, trial and error, and more trial and error, we came up with what is now our Juvenile Arboreal Enclosure. When fellow hobbyists came over to trade, sell/buy, etc. everyone who saw the enclosures expressed interested in purchasing them. Nearly every time a deal was made, the other party would leave disappointed as they weren’t leaving with an enclosure. Enough people showed interest in buying them that we wanted to find a way to make it possible. Thanks to a family contact we found a machine shop that could produce the enclosures at a reasonable price. All the other enclosures we have produced we’ve done originally for us and our own needs. Currently all our arboreal breeding females are housed in our adult tarantula cages.

cages-two

For a while, you didn’t have the extra-large adult tarantula enclosures for sale on your site, but it looks like you’ve had a batch for sale since late last year. Any hope of these becoming a permanent offering, or should folks jump on this limited supply while they last?

We hope to make the XL cage a permanent member of the Jamie’s Tarantulas cage line however, this depends on how the XL sales are this year. Thank you everyone for your support!

I’m assuming that keeping hundreds of spiders for breeding and sale could be an overwhelming and daunting task; what with feeding, maintenance, and packing for shipping. I’m also assuming that Jamie’s Tarantulas is a part-time business. How do you keep everything running smoothly and still have time for other work and other hobbies?

As of June 2016 we have about 3,200 specimens; it fluctuates between about 2.5-4k. We usually have the most slings from early summer to Black Friday and are pretty thinned out by February. Usually by March/April the eggsacs start to hatch and our selection then builds into the summer.

The job is challenging but very rewarding. If you do what you love you can leap out of bed every morning and keep going day after day. In a typical week we ship orders Monday through Wednesday. I am responsible for all tarantulas, roaches & customer service while Jon takes care of cages & packing. Every vial or deli cup has the tarantulas name hand-written so you know it was picked, prepped and packed by me with love. Thursday and Friday we spend doing business related errands such as picking up inventory. We also use these two days for our human related activities, such as doing laundry and grocery shopping. Saturday and Sunday we spend maintaining tarantulas and getting ready for the ship week. This includes feeding, breeding, misting, and roach maintenance. We also assemble enclosure kits, cut Styrofoam, assemble shipping boxes and pack shipping vials. Saturday through Tuesday nights, I’ll pull the tarantulas to be shipped and prep them for their journey, making sure they are healthy, the proper shipping weight, and well-hydrated.

During our busy week with Jamie’s Tarantulas, we must make time for our other responsibilities. We run an organic farm where we raise and sell organic-fed heritage poultry, eggs and pork. Before Jamie’s Tarantulas, I worked full time as a private chef. I still love cooking for a crowd, and Jon and I often cater weekend events featuring our home-grown organic meat and produce.

jamie-goatJon is a sub-contractor who can build and repair just about anything. As an extremely talented electrical engineer, he runs a side business, Elevated Audio, where he custom manufactures, repairs, resells and installs high-end audio systems and equipment. He also specializes in automotive electrical. As I’m here at my desk, he’s out working on a complete electrical system for a race car. He’ll rip every wire and sensor out then redo the whole thing from scratch to suit the unique needs of the build. I find it quite incredible!

I learned metal fabrication including MIG and TIG welding while interning for Martin Wilson at Monster Miata. The ability to create with metal has been instrumental in the success of all our businesses. We’ve custom made everything from metal catering carts, audio racks and tarantula room shelves.

All our income streams allow us to work for ourselves. It is a blessing our work and hobbies are one and the same. It brings me joy to share all the things I love with my customers whether it be organic free range eggs or a captive bred A. versicolor.

Wow, that sounds like an incredibly busy schedule for both of you. And as if selling tarantulas isn’t cool enough, the number of skills and businesses both of you have is staggering. Cooking, farming, metal-fabrication, and electrical engineering? Impressive just doesn’t cover it!

Now for a question I’ve wondered about for a while. Your Black Friday sale has become a bit of an annual tradition at my house, usually resulting in me waiting on the computer on Thanksgiving Day for the sales to go up. The variety of species and specimens you carry during this event is always quite impressive. When did you begin running this yearly sale? What does it take to get ready for this sale and to get the stock you need?

Years ago, I had multiple customers email to ask if I was having a Black Friday sale. It was a great idea so we went ahead and planned one. Although the sale was not as big as it is today, it was a huge success and has continued to grow over the years.

I typically start setting things aside 3-4 months in advance, however, I never know who will make the “final cut” as we’re very picky about what tarantulas we put up for sale. About a month before the sale we start cutting Styrofoam, building boxes, assembling kits and stocking our supply & cage inventory.

The sale is a lot of work, but it’s also nice to have enough saved to take a couple weeks to spend the holidays with family and friends. This year we’re going to make Black Friday bigger and better then any Black Friday before.

The N. chromatus and B. albopilosum on the website currently sold as 1”+ are now molting to about 1 1/4-1 1/2”. I will be able to determine gender for some of the juveniles their next molt, which should happen around September and October. That’s perfect timing for shipping in November. If we have enough available we’ll offer a confirmed male or female with a Juvenile Terrestrial Enclosure Kit special. We will have over a hundred different items available including many spiderlings and specials under $20. As always we’ll have our biggest selection and best prices of the year. We hope to see everyone there!

(For an early Black Friday Price list, skip to the bottom of the article!)

You can count me in!

For any folks out there who might one day be planning on getting into the business, what are the most challenging aspects of the tarantula retail business? What are the most rewarding ones?

Start small. Keep tarantulas and see if their care and maintenance something you would want to do regularly. Keep in mind these are living creatures that must be housed individually. At Jamie’s Tarantulas, maintaining thousands of specimens and keeping them in top condition is in itself a full time job. They count on us for all their needs, and it is necessary to be persistent and consistent with their maintenance and husbandry.

Packing and shipping is an art necessary for a successful tarantula retail business. We must remember we’re shipping live creatures. They have no choice but to count on us for their safe arrival. Getting the tarantula safely to its new home is should be the top priority, and live arrival should be guaranteed. Be sure customers are aware of the live arrival terms. You can’t have a successful business with unhappy customers!

The most challenging part of a tarantula retail business is the commitment and budgeting time. There is so much that has to be done, and we are the only ones to do it. We can’t call in sick or take substantial vacation leave. That is alright though, because I love my job!

The most rewarding aspect of the business is seeing our customers get excited about their tarantulas. I’ve even had many customers who’ve purchased a T to get over arachnophobia who end up “getting bit” and growing their collection! 

I’ve encountered many folks who given thought to getting into tarantula retail, but I often wondered if they appreciated the work it would entail. It certainly sounds rewarding, but quite challenging at the same time. While chatting through emails, you also made a great point about the difference between “dealers” and “breeders” and where each fits into the hobby. Care to explain?

I’ve been thinking about it a lot and the truth is, we need more breeders and less dealers. It seems (based on a percent of tarantula keepers) There are far less hobby breeders now then in years past. Every other old-time hobbyist I’ve asked has agreed with me.

jamie-snakeI have seen a lot of new hobbyists have a few successful eggsacs, set up a website and try to become dealers. I can appreciate the enthusiasm however, I’m often surprised at how many new dealers pop up, then disappear. Why does this happen?

We have learned so much over the years running a business, and we could never have been successful without our combined experience keeping and breeding tarantulas however, at least in our case it is a very, very small part of becoming a successful “tarantula dealer.”

Before focusing on “becoming a dealer”, hobbyists who want to grow their collection, and possibly use it as a source of income should first and very least become exceptional tarantula keepers. Then, once a firm foundation in husbandry is established the individual or collective should be focus on becoming excellent tarantula breeders. Just like everything else becoming successful in the field of tarantulas takes practice, patience and time. Always be observant, open to new ideas and most importantly take notes! If it is something they are good at and enjoy slowly and comfortable increase the size of their operation. The quality of the animals and service will speak for themselves.

I wish more hobbyists would consider this option, rather than burning bright and burning out. This doesn’t do anyone much good. The overhead involved with selling slings wholesale is minimal and can turn a hobby into a side income. More hobbyists could get a “piece of the pie” and in the meantime hone their skill and refine their technique. There would be more quality U.S captive-bred spiderlings on the market.

I am curious if you’ve noticed less hobby breeders to dealers and keepers? I find it harder every year to buy slings from US breeders however, there are more imports available. Is this just me?

I definitely understand what you’re saying, and I’ve heard others comment on this issue as well. It’s become a bit of a running joke among serious tarantula enthusiasts here that the Europeans are light-years ahead of their American counterparts in breeding Ts and producing enough captive-bred specimens to support the hobby. Many folks in the US don’t realize that when they are buying from dealers, they are often buying wild-caught import or captive-bred specimens bred across the pond. The hobby is more popular than ever, and it would be great if more folks got into breeding so that we could not rely on import (and enjoy lower prices!).

From a personal standpoint, I now like to buy from folks that I know are breeding much of their own stock, as I know they have their care down and I can expect to get healthier animals who haven’t spent weeks in transit. 

Speaking of the spiders, are there new or uncommon species that currently have you particularly excited? What’s currently on your wish list?

Harpachia pulchripes is my current favorite sling. I like to keep my favorite slings on my desk this one currently has my awe and attention!

Iridopelma sabolosum is on my wish list, but unless Brazil changes its export policy or someone illegally brown boxes them into the country, they will not be available in the U.S. Currently, there is still much rain forest within their range, although their habitat is being threatened by deforestation. As long as their natural home is intact, I can enjoy I. sabolosum knowing they’re living and thriving where they should be, as an important part of their natural environment.

My favorites and those on my wish list are always changing. It’s like asking me to pick my favorite food – there are so many! and if you ask tomorrow I might have a different answer. There are nearly a thousand different species of tarantulas, still many to be discovered. Each is so different and special.

I get a lot of visitors on “Tom’s Big Spiders” that are new to the hobby and looking for a good starter species. Which species do you believe are the best introductory tarantulas for someone just getting into the hobby?

jamie-birdNew World Terrestrials over about 3/4” typically make the best starter tarantulas. Tarantulas belonging to genus Grammostola and Brachypoelma are highly recommended. Some classic examples include: G. pulchripes (chaco golden knee), G. porteri (Rose-hair tarantula), G. rosea (red rose hair), G. pulchra (brazilian black), B. smithi (mexican red knee), B. albopilosum (mexican curly hair) & B. emilia (Mexican red leg)

For those looking for something more active and colorful, the C. cyaneopubescens (Green bottle blue “GBB”) is a great choice. Avicularia species larger than about 2” or so can also make a great starter tarantulas.

Old World species are not recommended for first time or inexperienced keepers.

I know that the genus Avicularia is one that is very close to your heart. Which is your favorite species in this genus? What would be your top three?

Avicularia versicolor has always been close to my heart. I’ve thought about the other two the last few weeks and simply cannot narrow it down any further. I love all Avicularia species. Each Avicularia is unique and beautiful in its own way. 

Fair enough! I’m assuming that there are some tarantulas you would hold onto even if you weren’t in the business. What species do you keep as part of your “personal” collection?

I have a B. smithi who I adore. However, my favorite B. smithi tarantula “Snickers” was given to my mother in 2012 as a birthday present. She is the “family spider” and thus, part of the family!

I joke about giving my mother a tarantula for Christmas every year, but she is HIGHLY aracnophobic, so I don’t think it will happen. Guess there won’t be a family spider in the Moran family!

It’s funny that you should mention that. I have had quite a few individuals contact me regarding the purchase of a tarantula as a way to help get over fear.

One customer’s psychologist recommended she purchase a “pet spider” to get over her severe arachnophobia. She didn’t just change her own mind, all her family, friends and co-workers all know how she adores her tarantula collection. Last time we spoke she had over 20 different species.

Jon and I joke the one who get a tarantula to get over their fear “get bit” worst of all. It is rare a recovering phobic doesn’t come back for another tarantula.

It doesn’t surprise me! I actually got my first tarantula 21 years ago to get over my irrational and embarrassing fear of spiders. 140+ Ts later, and I think that I’m finally over it.

Finally, a fun question. If you were limited to keeping only three species of tarantulas, one arboreal, one terrestrial, and one other of your choosing, which species would you select?

For the Arboreal an A. versicolor, for the terrestrial B. smithi. For the wild card I would choose my B. albopilosum female “Bad Hair Day”. 

Jamie, once again, thanks so much for taking the time to chat!

Thanks, Tom!

And now…the Black Friday Sale List! 

Sale starts 7:00 pm PST on Thanksgiving Day. Check the website for availability; new species may be added!

$18/15 Acanthoscurria geniculata (Brazilian Giant White Knee) 1/3”

$79/49 Aphonopelma seemanni (Costa Rican Stripe Knee) 3-4″ FEMALE #660/61         

$26/19 Augacephalus ezendami (Mozambique Gold Baboon) 1-1 1/4”

$69/$49 Avicularia metallica (Metallic Pink Toe) 3″ FEMALE #419

$39/37 Avicularia versicolor (Martinique pinktoe) 1/2-3/4″#6S and 1/2- 3/4”

$39/37 Avicularia versicolor (Martinique pinktoe) 3/4″+

$24/19 Brachypelma albopilosum (Curly Hair) 1-1 1/2”

$85/69 Brachypelma albopilosum (Curly Hair) 4-4 1/2″ FEMALE #707/8

$14/$9 Brachypelma albopilosum (Curlyhair tarantula) 1/2″ #721

$145/$129 Brachypelma auratum (Mexican Flame Knee) 2-2 1/2” FEMALE #715 

$135/$119 Brachypelma boehmei (Fire Leg Tarantula) 2″ FEMALE #706 

$155/$129 Brachypelma boehmei (Fire Leg Tarantula) 2 1/2-3“ FEMALE

$39/$34 Brachypelma boehmei (Fire Leg) 3/4″ #717

$39/$34 Brachypelma emilia (Mexican Red-leg) 1/2″ #740

$135/$95 Brachypelma smithi (Mexican Red Knee) 1 3/4-2″ FEMALE

$145/$109 Brachypelma smithi (Mexican Red Knee) 2-2 1/2″ FEMALE

8x $155/$124 Brachypelma smithi (Mexican Red Knee) 2 1/2-3″ FEMALE

$165/$139 Brachypelma smithi (Mexican Red Knee) FEMALE 3-3 1/4″

$14/$9 Brachypelma vagans (Mexican Red Rump) 1/2” #421

$69/$59 Brachypelma vagans (Mexican red rump) 2 1/2-3″ FEMALE #713

$18/$12 Ceratogyrus darlingi (Horned baboon) 3/4″ #742

$29/19  Chilobrachys dyscolus (Vietnam Blue) 1″ #575

$55/$49 Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens (Green bottle blue) 3/4”

$65/$59 Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens (Green bottle blue) 1- 1 1/4”

$80/$69 Ephebopus murinus (Skeleton Tarantula) 4-5″ FEMALE #709 

$25/$18 Euathlus sp. Red (Dwarf Chile Flame) 1/3-1/2″ #736

$15/$9 Grammostola porteri/rosea (pink) 1/2-3/4”

$45/$34 Grammostola porteri/rosea (pink) 3-4″ FEMALE #653

$59/$54 Grammostola pulchra (Brazilian black) 1″+ #422

$14/$9 Grammostola pulchripes (Chaco golden knee) 1/2″ #16

$20/$18 Grammostola pulchripes (Chaco golden knee) 3/4-1″ #15

$18/$14 Grammostola rosea (Rose-hair RCF) 1/2-3/4″ #28

$34/$25 Hapalopus sp. Colombia “Pumpkin Patch Large” 1/4-1/3”

$95/$79 Haplopelma lividum (Cobalt Blue) 3 1/2-4” FEMALE #716

$65/55 Heteroscodra maculata (Togo starburst baboon) 2 1/2-3″ FEMALE #678

$45/$35 Heteroscodra maculata (Togo starburst baboon) 2-3″ MALE #677 

$34/$22 Heterothele gabonensis 1″ #175

$39/$29 Iridopelma hirsutum 3/4-1″ #687

$45/$39 Lampropelma sp. “Borneo Black” 1″ #727

$45/$39 Lampropelma violaceopes (Singapore blue) 1-1 1/2″ #725

$22/$16 Lasiodora parahybana (Salmon pink birdeater) 3/4-1”

$135/$119 Lasiodora parahybana (Salmon Pink Birdeater) 4″ FEMALE #711

$64/$55 Monocentropus balfouri (Socotra Island Blue Baboon) 3/4-1″ #732 

$14/$9 Nhandu chromatus (Brazilian White Striped Bird-eater) 1/4” #741 

$24/$19 Nhandu chromatus (Brazilian White Striped Birdeater) 1-1 1/2” 

$125/$109 Nhandu coloratovillosus (Brazilian Black and White) 3 1/2-4″ FEMALE #710

$89/$69 Oligoxystre diamantinensis (Brazilian Blue Dwarf Beauty) 1/2-3/4″ #728 

$29/$24 Pelinobius muticus (King Baboon Tarantula) 1″ #722

$79/59 Phormictopus cancerides (Hispaniolan Giant) 4 1/2- 5″ FEMALE #662

$29/$22 Psalmopoeus irminia (Venezuelan Sun Tiger)   1 1/2″

$195/$149 Theraphosa apophysis (Goliath Pinkfoot) 4-4 1/2″ FEMALE #427

$75/$59 Thrixopelma ockerti (Flame Rump Tree Spider) 1 1/2-1 3/4″ FEMALE

SPECIALS:

BF Special: Brachypelma vagans (Mexican red rump) 1/3-1/2″ & Terrestrial Spiderling Enclosure 

$19.00

$16.00

BF Special: G. pulchripes (Chaco golden knee) 1/2″ & Terrestrial Spiderling Enclosure

$20.00

$16.00

BF Special: Grammostola porteri (Pink Rose hair) 1/2-3/4″ & Terrestrial Spiderling Enclosure

$21.00

$16.00

BF Special: Grammostola rosea “RCF” 1/2″ & Terrestrial Spiderling Enclosure

$24.00

$21.00

BF Special: Lasiodora parahybana (Salmon Pink Bird-eater) 1/2-3/4” & Terrestrial Spiderling Enclosure

$29.00

$23.00

BF Aphonopelma seemanni (Costa Rican Stripe Knee) 3-4″+ FEMALE #660/61 & Adult Complete Terrestrial Enclosure Kit

$183.00

$143.00

BF SPECIAL: Brachypelma albopilosum (Curly Hair) 4-4 1/2″ FEMALE #707/8 & Adult Complete Terrestrial Enclosure Kit

$189.00

$164.00

BF SPECIAL: Brachypelma auratum (Mexican Flame Knee) 2-2 1/2″ FEMALE #715 & Adult Complete Terrestrial Enclosure Kit

$249.00

$223.00

Psalmopoeus cambridgei “The Trinidad Chevron” Husbandry Notes

When I first got heavy into the hobby, I was immediately attracted to tarantulas from the genus Poecilotheria. As a result, I skipped some of the “stepping stone” arboreal species that keepers usually start out with to prepare for these advanced Old World spiders. For years, most of the aboreals in my collection (with the exception of two Avicularia) were from this genus. As I acquired more and more pokies, I tended to ignore some of the other amazing arboreal tarantulas available in the hobby. It wasn’t until very recently that I decided it was high time I tried out some of the other genera of tree-dwelling tarantulas; namely Psalmopoeus and Tapinauchenius. As luck would have it, an order from Pet Center USA earned me a free P. cambridgei, or “Trinidad Chevron” sling, kicking off a newfound appreciation for these awesome spiders.

p-cambridgei

When I first received my P. cambridgei in early October 2015, it was about 1″ or so. I housed it in 32 oz deli container ventilated with three rings of holes around the top. I added about 3″ of moist substrate (a combination of topsoil and vermiculite), a piece of cork bark flat with plastic leaves hot glued to it, some sphagnum moss, and a small bottle cap for a water dish. As a sling, I kept part of the substrate moist (not wet) at all times. To do this, I would pour some water down one of the sides, allowing it to percolate through the substrate down to bottom. This kept the lower levels moist while the top dried out a bit. I also tried to keep the water bowl full at all times, although she would often web it up or fill it with substrate.

As with all of my tarantulas, the temperatures ranged from 70-75° in the wintertime, and 75-80° during the hot summer months. Even when the temps were a bit cooler, this T was still very active and continued to eat well.

As a sling, my cambridgei burrowed a bit into the substrate and webbed up behind its cork bark using substrate and sphagnum to make “dirt curtains”. By the time I finally rehoused it, it had webbed up the entire enclosure right to the top. It was very reclusive during this period, quickly bolting into its burrow whenever disturbed. Even as a sling, this spider was very fast, darting out of view in the blink of an eye.

TIP: Many folks hear the term “arboreal” and immediately expect their slings to hang up high on the cork bark. However, many arboreal spiderlings will start their lives on the ground, and some will even burrow a bit. If your Psalmopoeus species sling starts digging, rest assured; there is nothing wrong with it. They usually outgrow this behavior once they put on some size.

While a sling, I would feed it one small cricket twice a week. As it put on some size, reaching about 3″, I moved up to a large cricket once a week. This spider has been a ravenous eater, taking all prey items down with amazing speed and ferocity. It has been a very fast-growing species, having molted five times in 10 months and putting on an impressive amount of size with each molt. At the time of this writing, it is about 4.5″.

In April of 2016, it had outgrown its deli cup, and I rehoused it into a larger enclosure. I used a one-gallon Mainstay clear canister which I ventilated with dozens of holes and hot glued a water dish up in one of the corners. Although I started with the substrate moist, I let it dry out. During the summer months when it is quite humid, I leave it dry and keep the water dish full. In the winter months, when the furnace is running and the air is dry, I moisten it on occasion by pouring a bit of water down the side. As it has webbed quite a bit, I also dribble some water on the webbing when I feed it to give it a choice as to where to drink.

TIP: For some fast and feisty species, rehousings can be the source of a lot of anxiety.  If ever an escape or bite is going to happen to the careful keeper, this is the time. For fast-growing species, like P. cambridgei, many folks choose to rehouse them into their adult enclosures much earlier than they would with other species.  This limits the number of rehousings that the keeper has to perform. 

When first relocated to this new enclosure, the cambridgei was quite shy, building a web and secreting itself behind the cork. Now that it has settled in, it sits right out in the open most of the time.  Unlike some of my other skittish arboreals that will bolt to hide when disturbed, this one will boldly stay put.

After its next molt, I’ll be rehousing it into its adult enclosure. As this species can reach 7″, it will be getting an arboreal enclosure roughly 7 gallons or so.

The P. cambridgei  is a beautiful, fast-growing arboreal species that makes a wonderful showcase spider. That said, they are very fast and many report that their specimens have quite the defensive attitudes. However, this speed and “attitude” make it a great stepping stone species to Poecilotheria without worry of the more potent venom of this Old World genus.