About This Blog

After keeping a G. porteri for over 16 years, I decided that I wanted to add another tarantula to my collection.  Several years later, I now keep over 100 specimens and 70+ different species. It’s safe to say that I am now completely addicted to the hobby.

I’m NOT an expert, and I’m currently still learning about keeping these fascinating creatures. In fact, there are so many species, that I suspect that I’ll still be learning years from now. This blog is a bit of a journal to track my interest in the hobby and to share some of the information I’ve learned. A teacher by trade, I enjoy passing along what I’ve information and techniques I’ve discovered and helping others in their successful pursuit of this hobby. I enjoy hearing from folks, whether through comments on the blog or email.

I have done and continue to do a lot of research, and I will only be discussing animals I personally keep, so the information I present should be current and accurate. I also regularly update older posts with current photos, observations, and information. However, this is an ever-evolving hobby, so I implore anyone interested in keeping these animals to use whatever they read here as a springboard for further research on techniques or species-specific care.

For those interested in the hobby or who have questions about Ts, please check out Arachnoboards, a forum dedicated to the hobby, I personally check this forum daily, and spend many hours a week searching threads and learning from experienced keepers. Another great, beginner-friendly resource is the Tarantula Forum; folks there are very friendly and knowledgeable.

Currently Keeping:

TARANTULAS

  • 0.0.1 A. anax
  • 0.1.0 A. chalcodes
  • 0.1.0 A. schmidti
  • 0.0.1 A. amazonica
  • 0.0.1 A. juruensis
  • 0.1.0 A. metallica
  • 0.1.0 A. versicolor
  • 0.0.1 A. theraphosidae
  • 1.1.1 B. albopilosum
  • 0.1.0 B. albopilosum “hobby”
  • 0.0.1 B. albiceps
  • 0.0.1 B. auratum
  • 0.1.0 B. boehmei/baumgarteni
  • 0.0.1 B. baumgarteni
  • 0.0.1 B. klaasi
  • 0.1.0 B. smithi
  • 0.0.1 B. vagans
  • 0.1.0 C. guangxiensis
  • 0.0.1 C. dyscolus
  • 0.0.2 C cyaneopubscens
  • 0.2.0 E. pachypus
  • 1.2.0 Euathlus sp. Red
  • 0.1.0 E. parvulus
  • 0.0.3 G. pulchripes
  • 0.0.1 G. pulchra
  • 0.1.0 G. iheringi
  • 0.1.0 G. porteri
  • 0.0.1 G. rosea
  • 1.2.0 Hapalopus sp. Columbia large
  • 0.1.0 H. maculata
  • 0.2.0 H. gigas
  • 0.1.0 H. lividum
  • 0.1.1 H. pulchripes
  • 0.0.1 L. polycuspulatus
  • 0.0.1 L. difficilis
  • 0.1.0 L. itabunea
  • 0.1.2 L. parahybana
  • 0.0.1 L. crotalus
  • 0.0.1 I. mira
  • 1.1.0 L. violaceopes
  • 0.0.1 L. sp. Borneo black
  • 0.1.9 M. balfouri
  • 0.1.2 M. cabocla
  • 0.0.1 N. chromatus
  • 0.1.0 N. tripepii
  • 0.0.2 O. philippinus
  • 0.0.2 O. sp. Blue panay
  • 0.1.0 P. antinous
  • 0.0.2 Pamphobeteus sp. Duran
  • 0.0.2 P. muticus
  • 1.0.2 P. crassipes
  • 0.0.3 P. atrichomatus
  • 1.2.1 P. cancerides
  • 0.0.1 P. cautus violet
  • 0.0.3 Phormictopus sp. green
  • 1.1.0 Phormictopus sp. blue
  • 0.1.2 Phormictopus sp. purple
  • 0.0.2 Phormictopus sp. South Hispaniola
  • 0.1.0 P. formosa
  • 0.0.2 P. hanumavilasumica
  • 0.0.1 P. metallica
  • 0.1.0 P. ornata
  • 0.1.0 P. regalis
  • 0.0.1 P. rufilata
  • 0.0.1 P. striata
  • 0.0.1 P. smithi
  • 0.1.0 P. vittata
  • 0.0.2 P. sazimei
  • 0.1.0 P. cabridgei
  • 0.1.0 P. irminia
  • 0.1.0 P. pulcher
  • 0.0.2 P. reduncus
  • 0.1.0 P. murinus
  • 0.0.1 Sericopelma sp. “Santa Catalina”
  • 0.1.0 T. gigas
  • 0.0.1 Tapinauchenus sp. “colombia”
  • 2.1.0 T. stirmi
  • 0.0.1 T. ockerti
  • 0.0.2 V. paranaensis

SCORPIONS

  • 0.0.1 B. gigas
  • 0.1.30 C. gracilis
  • 0.0.2 C. vittatas
  • 0.0.1 H. troglodytes
  • 0.1.1 Heterometrus sp.
  • 0.0.1 P. transvaalicus
  • 0.0.1 R. junceus
  • 0.0.1 T stigmurus
  • 0.0.1 V. confusus

MYGALOMORPHS

  • 0.0.2 C. truncata

    We also have a four dogs (three pitties and a yellow Lab, all rescues) a Carpet Python and a Ball Python.

13 thoughts on “About This Blog

    • Hello!

      It’s funny you should ask. I actually acquired my first Psalmopoeus species, a P. cambridgei, just a few months ago. What a spunky little spider. The speed really is impressive, and I’ve been quite impressed with the growth rate so far.I also have a P. pulcher waiting to ship. Once they get a bit larger, I’ll be able to give a better comparison to Poecilotheria species, but so far I’m loving them. 🙂

      Like

  1. you sound like you really know you’re stuff about these spiders, I know absolutely 0 about tarantulas or any type of arachnid for that matter, (scorpions, camel spiders, etc…), it’s nice to know that you have a true passion for these little guys, especially helping out potential new spider/arachnid/bug/animal/etc… keepers and enthusiasts, kudos to you and I wish you even greater success and happiness in the near and far future.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi, Blake! Thanks so much for the kind words. They’ve been a bit of a fascination of mine for several years, and I love sharing what I’ve learned. It’s easy for me to remember what it was like to be new to the hobby and to try to find reliable info. Thanks again!!!

      -Tom

      Like

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