Tarantula Feeding – What, when, and how much to feed

P.-crassipes-eating

Now that I’ve got a tarantula, how do I go about feeding it?

Whether you have a dog, a cat, a hamster, or a pot-bellied pig, if you’re a pet owner, you’ve become accustomed to certain standards of care for your wards. For those of us who have kept these more domesticated pets, we are very used to feeding and providing fresh water to our pets daily, often more than once, and having a variety of conveniently-packaged foods available for their consumption. Most of these pet foods come with handy instructions on just how much to feed your pet, dependent upon the size of the animal. When our furry little friend doesn’t eat for a couple days, we take it as an immediate sign that something is very wrong and seek veterinary care.

Well, now you own a tarantula, and suddenly, all of the rules you’ve learned about pet care go right out the window.

No one sells “Tarantula Chow”, and there are a plethora of feeder insect that would make a good meal for your new pet. There are no “portions”, and determining what size item to drop in with your hungry spider can be cause for stress. As for a feeding schedule, some healthy adult species only need to be fed once a week. And if your T doesn’t eat for a while, it is no cause for immediately alarm. This is an animal that can go months at a time without eating and still stay healthy.

Tarantulas don’t come with instructions, and learning some of the rules and tricks around feeding them can be a stressful and tricky endeavor that involves experience and research. The message boards are often full of posts by newbies asking feeding-related questions like, “How often should I feed?” or “What size item should I offer?” Here, I hope to answer some of the most asked questions and give those new to the hobby one less thing to stress about.

I. Frequency of feedings:

There are a few important points to consider when coming up with a feeding schedule. The life stage of the tarantula, the size of the prey you are feeding it, and the species you are feeding should all be carefully considered when devising any sort of feeding schedule.

Sling? Juvenile? Adult?

Younger tarantulas, like slings and juveniles, are doing a lot of growing and are much more vulnerable than their adult counterparts. Slings are particularly fragile, and keepers report more sudden and unexplained deaths in the sling stage than in adults. In the wild, a spiderling  is particularly vulnerable to predators early in life, so it behooves the young T to eat as much as possible as often as possible so it can quickly grow out of this precarious stage. Therefore, most keepers choose to feed their slings as often as they’ll eat. For many, a feeding schedule of every two or three days for slings is perfect. However, if they are being offered a large prey item, once a week will certainly work.

A lot of folks express concern that they can overfeed a sling. Although some have insisted that a tarantula can become too fat, resulting in organ failure and molting issues, there has been no scientific proof of this, and most keepers believe it to be a myth. Most slings will chow down until they are ready to enter premolt, then they will stop. They will NOT eat until they explode. The only danger posed to a fat T is a possible abdomen rupture from a fall.

Once the tarantula reaches the “juvenile” stage at around 1.5-2″ or so, most keepers ease off on the feeding a bit. A spider of this size is usually out of its fragile sling stage, and growth at this point will slow down a bit. Although you can certainly continue with a more aggressive feeding schedule at this point (see “power feeding” below), it is no longer necessary. At this stage, I usually feed my animals a larger prey item once or twice a week.

For adult tarantulas, you need to also consider the species before settling on frequency. An adult Grammostola porterie/rosea needs only four or five crickets a month to be healthy. Conversely, an adult Therophosa or Pamphobeteus species would eat that in a single meal a couple times a week. Generally, the feisty tropical genera (Therophosa, Phormictopus, Pamphobeteus, Acanthoscurria, Nhandu, etc.) will need larger and more frequent meals.

As an example, my 6″ Pamphobeteus antinous female eats five crickets and one 1.5″ dubia roach in a single week. My 6″ female G. porteri, on the other hand, eats four crickets a month. Both species are healthy and plump, but the feeding schedule for one would definitely not work for the other.

Know the species of T you keep and listen to other keepers about its appetite. If you have questions, ask. Observe the feeding responses and growth rates to determine if more or less is needed.

A word about “power feeding”.

If you’re around the hobby long enough, you’ll hear folks talk about “power feeding” their tarantulas. Power feeding is when the keeper jacks up the heat and feeds his tarantulas as much as they will eat in order to grow them to maturity faster. This is usually done in an effort to get breedable adults as quickly as possible. Although this could shorten a tarantula’s lifespan as it is rushed through various instars (some males may mature in less than a year), there is no proof that this is harmful for the T.

II. What size feeders to use?

A.-theraphosoides

The size of the feeder being given to the tarantula can certainly impact the frequency that you feed the animal. Some keepers choose to feed their specimens smaller prey items more often. Others will offer their Ts much larger insects, then feed them only once a week or so. There is really not any right or wrong way, and the size and schedule comes down to the keeper’s discretion. Personally, I tend to feed medium-sized items a couple times a week.

Many keepers stress about the size of prey they should offer to their spiders. A rule of thumb many keepers use is that the prey item should be no larger than the abdomen of the tarantula. So, a juvenile with a abdomen length of about 5 mm would likely be comfortable with a pinhead cricket. Personally, I feed my slings and juveniles prey items slightly smaller than the total length of their bodies, and adults I feed items no larger than their abdomens. I’ve found that this works very well for me, although it is by no means law. Again, it comes down to the personal preference of the keeper. When in doubt, it makes sense to err on the side of caution and give your T smaller, more manageable prey.

Use your discretion.

Now, these are just guidelines, and it is okay for keepers to deviate from them. Case in point, some species of Ts will actually only attack smaller prey items. My M. balfouri and H. incei gold juveniles, for example, would only take much smaller prey for the longest time. Even when my balfouri juvies were about 1.75 inches, they would only attack small crickets. Conversely, my P. cancerides juveniles would easily take down sub-adult crickets at that size. Observe your Ts and their feeding habits, and feel free to go up or down a prey size as needed.

What to do for tiny slings?

For very small slings (1/4-3/8″ or so) small food can be very difficult to come by. Although B. lateralis roach nymphs can be a good alternative due to their small size, they are not always easy to come by. In these instances, it may be necessary to pre-kill and cut up a larger prey item into a more appropriate size. Spiderlings will scavenge feed, so this is a great way to make sure that they can eat as much as they want while not putting them in danger by dropping in an overly-large prey item.

Although this may sound a bit gross (and, well, it really is!), cutting the leg off of a larger cricket, or cutting a meal worm into smaller pieces is a perfect way to feed your tiny sling. Just carefully place the food chunk in the enclosure and, if the sling is hungry, it will find it. Just be sure to remove any excess the next day, as they may not consume the whole piece. If they don’t finish the item, you might want to wait several days before offering another item.

III. How many items should I feed at a time?

In the cases of slings and juveniles, I would say one prey item per feeding is completely appropriate. At this size, they usually have their hands full with an appropriately-sized food item, and adding a second would only serve to stress the animal.

For some adults, dropping in a more than one item can be an appropriate option. Personally, I tend to use larger insects, like dubia roaches, rather than bombard my tarantulas with a half-dozen spastic crickets. I’ve also seen animals become visibly agitated when more than one item is dropped in.

If you do drop in multiples, be sure anything that isn’t eaten is removed in a timely manner and that animal seems comfortable with taking down multiple feeders.

IV. What are my feeder options?

There are many possibilities when deciding what to feed your Ts. Personally, I find the many inverts available as feeders to be quite convenient, and I will often mix up what I feed my spiders to create a more diverse diet. Here are some of the more common feeder insects available as well as some pros and cons for each.

NOTE: Some folks supplement their larger tarantulas’ diets with vertebrates such as mice, geckos, and snakes. Personally, I’m not a fan of this. Besides being a rough death for the vertebrates, the mess left behind after the tarantula feeds can be a perfect breeding ground for bacteria and pests.

CricketsCrickets: Crickets have long been the go-to feeder insect in the hobby. They are sold at most pet stores in several sizes that make them a convenient feeder insect for almost any size T, and they can be purchased in bulk for those with large collections. They can also be relatively inexpensive if purchased in large quantities. TIP: To keep extras alive, use a large critter keeper or modified plastic storage container, provide egg cartons for a hide, and feed dry oats or fish food. Humidity kills them, so I supply slices of potato for moisture.

PROS:

  • Available in every pet store
  • Convenient pinhead, small, medium, large sizes
  • Non-invasive if they escape

CONS:

  • They can smell quite horrible
  • Can be difficult to keep alive
  • Can eat a molting T
  • Can be pricey when purchased in small quantities

mealwormMealworms: Another readily-available food source for tarantulas. Not only can mealworms be purchased in many different sizes, but they can also be raised rather easily. Unlike other prey items on this list, they can be kept in a refrigerator, meaning you can keep some on hand for when you need them. They are also very easy to reproduce and raise (for a tutorial on how to start a colony, click away!).  TIP: These are a prey item that will dig (often to return later as a black beetle that the T won’t eat), so I will often crush the heads before dropping them in to keep them from burrowing.

PROS:

  • Sold at most pet stores
  • Can be stored in a refrigerator for future use
  • No odor
  • Very easy to raise

CONS:

  • A bit small for some of the larger Ts
  • Can burrow and disappear if given the chance.

SuperwormsSuperworms: Like mealworms, superworms are another beetle larvae that can make for a good tarantula feeder. They are relatively inexpensive, and their larger sizes make them a better choice for larger Ts. They can also be raised and bred in colonies for those interested in always keeping some on hand. However, it needs to be mentioned that these worms WILL bite and eat a tarantula. TIP: To prevent a superworm from injuring or killing a T, either cut off or crush its head before offering it.

PROS:

  • Sold at many pet stores
  • Larger sizes are great for large Ts
  • Can be bred in colonies

CONS:

  • Not all pet stores carry them
  • They bite and injure/kill a T
  • Are a little more involved to raise
  • Can’t be refrigerated for storage

B.-lateralisB. lateralis roaches: Also known as “rusty reds” or “red racers”, these roaches make a wonderful alternative to crickets. They are fast moving, bold little bugs that will stay out in the open rather than dig. Their propensity to explore and move around when dropped into an enclosure makes them a very attractive prey item for Ts. Adults are also a bit larger than crickets, making them a little better for larger Ts. These can be purchased online in bulk, or kept in colonies. TIP: These are fast little roaches who are quite good at escaping when given the chance. Unlike the next roach on this list, given the right conditions, this one could thrive and be a pest in the home.

PROS:

  • Readily available online
  • Don’t burrow
  • Fast movements seem to attract Ts
  • Can be raised in colonies
  • Nymphs are great for small slings

CONS:

  • Not normally available in pet stores
  • If they escape, they can breed in the home
  • Fast and tricky to catch

bdubiamaleandfemale5B. dubia roaches: This tropic roach species can hit sizes of 1.5-2″ making them a great feeder choice for larger tarantulas (I feed most of my large tropical species with B. dubia). They can be purchased as colonies (about $30 shipped), which will produce nymphs of many sizes, providing a food source for slings, juvies, and adults. The one main drawback to this species is that some tarantulas won’t take them. TIP: This roach will freeze and “play dead” when a tarantula approaches, often leading to the T passing it up. They can also dig and hide (I’ve had ones I thought were eaten reappear months later). To prevent either of these scenarios, crush their heads before dropping them in. This will cause them to wander aimlessly keep them from burrowing and playing dead.

PROS:

  • Easy and cheap to raise
  • Adults are large and great for big Ts
  • No odors
  • Won’t breed in most homes if they escape

CONS:

  • Some tarantulas won’t eat them
  • They can burrow and hide
  • They play dead when a T approaches
  • Not usually found in pet stores

These are just a handful of the feeder options available, and some ones that I have experience with. I know hobbyists in the UK often use locusts, which sound like a fantastic food source. There are also waxworms, earthworms, Madagascar hissing cockroaches, and lobster roaches. Feel free to experiment with any or all of the available feeders; a diverse diet is always a good thing.

For a wonderful article about some pros and cons of crickets, B. dubia, and B. lateralis roaches, check out A Roach in a Coach is Still … Food !

V. How to feed your tarantula in three easy steps!

I often read about the strange, complicated, and often totally unnecessary rituals some keepers go through when they feed their Ts. Now, I’m not judging, and if it works for you, great. However, I do think that some folks make this process a lot more complicated then it needs to be. In most situations, a tarantula can be feed in three easy steps…

  1. OPEN the enclosure –  Be sure to know where your T is when you take this step, and only open the enclosure as much as you have to.
  2. Drop in the prey item – You don’t have to hold it in front of the T or make it dance with tongs. Just drop it in!
  3. CLOSE the enclosure – Make sure the cage in securely latched and closed.

Congratulations, your tarantula has been fed!

P. vittattaAll joking aside, there is no need to do anything other than what is described above. This is an animal that has evolved over millions of years; they wouldn’t have made it this far if they couldn’t figure out how to eat. Tarantulas are excellent hunters and, in most circumstances, they will have no problems detecting and snatching prey. Don’t worry about dropping the feeder right next to the spider either, as you will chance startling the T. I like to drop it across the enclosure from the tarantula to give it a chance to detect the prey animal and to get a chance to hunt. It is quite fascinating to see how the different species go about capturing their food.

It worth it to note that many tarantulas are nocturnal, so you may want to do your feedings at night before bed. If the feeder hasn’t been consumed by the next morning, remove it. That being said, I feed the majority of mine in the afternoon, and I’ve seen the majority of them, even the “pet holes”, eat.

VI. But what if it doesn’t eat?

If your specimen starts refusing meals, don’t panic. Tarantulas will often refuse food during premolt (read about premolt here), and some species will fast for long periods of time. This is an animal that can go months without eating and still remain healthy, so missed meals are no reason to freak out.

When a T isn’t eating, don’t keep dropping bugs in with it every day. Instead, wait a week or two, drop in a prey item, and watch to see if there is any interest. If the T doesn’t eat, take the item out and try again in another week. Always make sure that fresh water is available.

VII. Tongs are for maintenance!

Finally, in most instances, there is no need to tong-feed your tarantula. I hear so many people new to the hobby using tongs to essentially hand-feed their animals. In most cases, this is completely unnecessary and serves only to put the keeper and the T in danger. Not only can a spider injure a fang if it attacks the tongs, but they’ve been known to run up tongs to escape or bite their owners. And, as someone who keeps feisty and fast Old World tarantulas, trust me when I tell you that you don’t want to try tong feeding an OBT or a pokie!

When in doubt, ask!

This is a hobby in which research and, more importantly, experience brings confidence. Although many of the issues one might encounter when feeding have been addressed above, there are always situations that pop up that might be unusual or rare. Luckily, there are forums and sites like this one that you can go to for help and guidance. Before you panic, though, always remember that tarantulas are tough, adaptive animals that have survived millions of years of evolution and, sometimes, questionable husbandry.

Advertisements

106 thoughts on “Tarantula Feeding – What, when, and how much to feed

  1. I have been feeding my LP sling 2 freshly killed crickets a week. After I offered it a slightly larger one, it has immediately closed its burrow and won’t come out. Should I worry about this?

    Like

    • Hi, Jessy.

      I wouldn’t worry at all. 🙂

      It is likely just a coincidence that your T refused prey after you offered a bigger item. If the prey is prekilled, then Ts will usually take something much larger than they would if it was alive.

      I have three LPs, and two of the ones I had as slings would bury themselves completely, closing off the entrances to their dens, when they were entering premolt. They would then open them back up again after they molted, hardened, and were ready to eat. This is their way of protecting themselves while they are preparing to molt.

      I had one little guy that didn’t come out of his den for three molts. I would occasionally catch glimpses of him through the bottom of his enclosure, but that was about it. Every month or so, he would close off his den as he molted. When he hit about 2″, he became much more bold, staying out in the open most of the time.

      When he opens his entrance up again, you’ll know he’s ready to eat.

      I hope this helps!

      Tom

      Like

      • I’ve had a few species that I fed pre-killed to when they were smaller have a difficult time taking the live prey when it was first offered. When this occurred, I fed them something much smaller than I normally would so that they’d have no problem taking it down. I did this for a couple feedings before increasing the size of the prey. This has worked well for me.

        Is he trying to catch the cricket and not succeeding? If that is the case, you can try removing the cricket’s jumping legs. It will still be able to move around, but it won’t be able to leap.

        Like

  2. I’m not sure if it ate the one I gave yesterday, but it was gone, so I decided to give it another one. It’s not eating the cricket and now the cricket is in the burrow with it.

    Like

    • I think I have made a mistake… I think the T may have been in premolt. The cricket was scaring it, so I removed the cricket. Do I wait a few days before feeding it again?

      Like

  3. If you think it may be in premolt, then you did the right thing by pulling the cricket out. If he’s been eating well until this point, I would wait a week before trying him with another cricket. If you try it before that, drop in another pre-killed one. That way, if it happens to molt that day, the cricket won’t be able to harm him. If the cricket is there the next day, take it out.

    Recognizing when they are in premolt can be tricky, and I still occasionally drop a prey item into a T’s enclosure when it is in premolt. It happens.

    Like

    • No apologies needed! It looks to me like that T just molted very recently. Its abdomen appears to be quite small, especially compared to the carapace. Have you tried offering a pre-killed cricket again? When I first try feeding my Ts after a recent molt, I usually start with something smaller in size. After they take a couple prey items, I’ll move up from there. As yours is used to be offered pre-killed prey, this may be the place to start until it fattens up a bit.

      Tom

      Like

  4. Thanks for everything! Turns out the live cricket that disappeared a few days ago was hiding in the burrow with the T. I guess he isn’t hungry. Everytime I try to grab the cricket, it goes down the burrow.

    Like

  5. Hi, it’s me…again. I’m sorry to bother you again, but when I dropped a mealworm, it burrowed into the ground and my LP didn’t react. Should I be worried?

    Like

    • Hi, Jessy.

      Please…you’re not a bother at all!

      How large was the T you were feeding? In theory, a meal worm could bite a tarantula, but it would be very uncommon. The biggest risk would be to a T that is molting, as they are vulnerable and soft during this time. Personally, I wouldn’t be worried. It will likely resurface again, perhaps as a black beetle (I’ve had this happen twice). If this occurs, just remove the beetle as the T won’t eat it. Or, the T often finds it when the worm surfaces, and you just never see it again.

      A trick I use with mealworms is to smash their heads before I drop them in. Gross, I know, but they will continue to move around a bit but it will prevent them from burrowing. You could also cut their heads off, which would have the same effect and keep them from being able to bite.

      Before I started smashing the heads, I had a few burrow and disappear. In these instances, they never harmed the Ts.

      Hope that helps!

      Tom

      Like

      • Here’s a picture:

        Sorry for the blurry quality, but it’s hard to take a pic sometimes. Should I take the T out and completely clean the tank (there’s still a cricket lurking around)? And what’s the husk of web on the side?

        Like

  6. Hi! great feeding tip!

    I would be glad if you replied to this!
    Recently i bought a b smithi sling. And it molted for about 1 month ago and it still hasn’t ben eating, or atleast i think so. Becuse it has made a burrow and he/she stays in the burrow and makes it bigger each day, and when im supposed to feed him i drop small pinhead in to the burrow. And when i look the other day the criket is gone. I kept doing this every four daya now but his abdomen doesent grow bigger.

    So here is my question, can a sling molt without eating?
    And is it normal for spiderlings to not eat for a longer period after molt?

    // sorry for my bad english

    Like

    • Hello, Jakeng.

      Your English is fine! 🙂

      How large is your sling?

      B. smithi are amazing tarantulas, but they are VERY slow growing. I’ve noticed that mine take a bit longer to start putting on weight and getting fatter abdomens than many of my other species. As long as the crickets are disappearing, and its eating them, it will eventually put on some size. I have a 4″ female that molted 8 months ago, and although I was feeding her two large crickets a week, it took a few months before her abdomen looked plump again.

      Also, if you feed smaller prey items, it will take the spider longer to start showing size.

      If you’re not sure if it’s eating the crickets, you can try leaving a pre-killed cricket at the mouth of it’s den overnight; don’t drop it in. If it’s gone in the morning, you’ll know that your T is eating.

      I try not to drop crickets directly in my Ts’ dens because if they are not hungry or are molting, it could distress or harm the T. Just something to think about.

      Do you have a photo of the enclosure?

      All the best!

      Tom

      Like

      • Hi tanks for responding!

        I cant figure out how to post a pictur but i can tell you how it looks:

        Its about 7 cm of substrate in the enclosure
        There is alsoe a little wood bark that he/she have been building its tunnel under
        I spray it twice a week!
        The sling is about 2cm, if you measure it from the end of the backlegs to the top of the front legs stretched out

        Alsoe how long does it take for a b smiti sling to grow in to a juvinile, feed him every four day and mist twice a week

        Jakeng( my real name is jakob)

        Like

  7. Forgot to say that the enclosure is a rektangulsr shape an measures 7 cm on the edges its 10 cm of heigt inthe enclosure, but whit substrate the height gets to 3 cm

    Like

    • Hi, Jakeng!

      The dimensions and depth of your substrate both sound good. They will tunnel at that age, so you’ve given it enough substrate to create its own den. Is the substrate dry overall and just wet when you spray it?

      What are your temperatures?

      It sounds like your care and feeding schedule are also quite good. If it’s eating twice a week, you should start seeing it start to get fatter in the abdomen soon. I would try leaving a prekilled cricket at the edge of its den to prove to yourself whether or not it’s eating.

      The growth rate of slings can vary depending on the temperature they are kept at, how often they are fed, and the genetics of the animal. B. smithi is a VERY slow growing species, and it could be two years or so before it hits 7cm or so. The good news is, females are thought to live to 35 years or more and males can make it to 10, which means you will have it for a very long time.

      Hope that helps!

      Tom

      Like

  8. Hi tom!
    The top layer of the substrate (about 1-2 cm ) is bone dry, but the rest is still a little damp so it can have a drink, the temp is about 23-24 celcius degreeds.

    Like

    • Hi, Jakeng!

      You’re temps are right around what I keep mine at, and you should get a decent growth rate from it. If you want it to grow faster, temps around 26-27 will speed up its metabolism even more and lead to faster growth. Still, this is a slow grower, so expect it to take a while to reach juvenile/sub-adult size.

      Tom

      Like

  9. Hi Tom!

    Earlier this morning i found five white spots that had this stone powderlike texture. they are in the end of the slings burrow so i cant get to them without destroying his/her burrow. They wasn’t there yesterday so i dont think its mold. Is it spider poop?
    Should i remove it?

    The sling is a 2,5cm b. Smithi sling.

    Like

    • Hi, Jakob.

      Yup, that sounds like tarantula poop to me! Just wait until one decides to decorate its enclosure with it. I have a couple that leave little white dots all over the sides of their cages. 🙂

      I would not bother removing it, especially if it means damaging the den.

      Hope that helps!

      Tom

      Like

  10. Hello,
    My adult rosehair hasn’t eaten in 8 months. I’ve tried feeding her roaches, super worms, and crickets. She seems to be too slow to catch her prey, and even when I’ve tried assisting her (guiding the insect towards her with a long chopstick) she can’t seem to grab them even when they’re directly underneath her. Sometimes she doesn’t even seem interested in eating and gets stressed out by them. Is there a reason why she might be so lethargic, and won’t eat? I maintain the temp and humidity in her tank and she seems happy otherwise. Any input is appreciated! Thanks!

    Like

    • Hi, Andi.

      How long have you had your rosehair for? Has she ever eaten since you’ve acquired her?

      G. porterie/rosea (the species commonly referred to as “rosehairs”) are infamous for fasting for long stretches of time. This is a common behavior in this species, and one that tends to confound and frustrate keepers. In most instances, this is completely natural behavior. She will eat when she is ready. They are normally a slow a sedentary species, only springing to life when hunting, so the “lethargic” behavior you’re describing may just be the normal behavior of spider who is currently not interested in eating.

      I do have one more question for you; you mention that you maintain the humidity in the tank. You are not misting or keeping it humid, are you?

      Tom

      Like

      • Hello!
        I am new to this hobby, I have an adult b. Smithi and she only eat once this month, is it natural? I dont know a thing what’s happening to her, she’s my bestfriend’s first T and i want to give her the best care i could. Is there any problem with my smithi? Reply asap. Thanks in advance ☺☺ߑʰߑʀ

        Like

      • Hi, JM.

        It could be totally natural. Was she eating well before this? Does her abdomen look plump? I usually feed mine once a week, but it’s possible that yours is in premolt.

        Do you have a photo?

        All the best,

        Tom

        Like

      • Hi Tom,

        Thank you for replying! I feel a lot better knowing that her behavior is normal.
        I’ve had her for over two years, and she’s always eaten regularly and had no problem hunting. About 8 months ago I moved into a new apartment, and since then she hasn’t been interested in eating.
        That was a poor choice of words on my part; I don’t mist or keep it humid. I know that her dish and her food are enough of a water source for her.

        Thanks,
        Andi

        Like

      • Hi, Andi.

        You’re most welcome! My apologies for asking about the humidity; I just wanted to double-check, as I’ve had folks tell me that they spray their rose hairs down. Yikes!

        A change in environment can sometimes trigger a fast. We also just had winter, and they seem to recognize the changing of the seasons even if the home’s temperature stays warm. As long as she’s nice and plump, I wouldn’t worry.

        When mine fast, I usually offer something every two to three weeks. If it doesn’t eat, I’ll take the item out and try again in another couple weeks.

        Hopefully, she’ll eat soon and spare you any more stress. 🙂

        All the best!

        Tom

        Like

  11. Hello!
    I am new to this hobby, I have an adult b. Smithi and she only eat once this month, is it natural? I dont know a thing what’s happening to her, she’s my bestfriend’s first T and i want to give her the best care i could. Is there any problem with my smithi? Reply asap. Thanks in advance ☺☺👊👊

    Like

  12. An option for cricket keeping that I’ve discovered (via a couple of cricket-ranchers and my reptile store guy): flukers cricket quencher. (The blue…not the orange.)
    http://www.amazon.com/Flukers-16-Ounce-Cricket-Quencher-Original/dp/B0002DHPCQ/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1438012787&sr=8-2&keywords=flukers+cricket+quencher

    There is an “orange” that is supposed to be “complete”, but reviews are not very good. The “blue”…works.

    I’ve got two cricket ranches going (one juvies for the slings, and medium/large for the grups), and this stuff beats water all to heck and back. I grind up a bit of corn meal, oats and some rice in a food processor and put that in a small cup, the flukers in another and no fatalities from drowning OR cannibalism. (going on over a week at this point.)

    What is nice is that even if you aren’t a large breeder or keeping a large numbers of pets, keeping 20-30 crickets alive and ready for feeding beats a run to the pet store all the time. 🙂

    Like

    • That’s a great recommendation!

      I actually used to use the Cricket Quencher, but I ran out of it one day and, out of necessity, I used a couple pieces of potato instead. It worked just as well for me for as moisture source and, as we always have potatoes here, I stuck with it. I’ve also used apple and carrots as well.

      I loved the Cricket Quencher, but it just became an added expense as I had to keep more and more crickets. Right now, I go through about 100 crickets or so a week, so it’s just cheaper to use the veggies I already have on hand. Plus, those little bugs can get pricey, too!

      Now that I’m pushing 100 tarantulas, I’m leaning on my dubia roach colony a bit more. They are just SO much easier to maintain and work with, and they don’t stink like hell. There always seem to be some Ts that don’t cotton to them, but for my big guys and gals, they work great!

      But I agree completely that for smaller cricket colonies, the Flukers works great and can be very convenient!

      Tom

      Liked by 1 person

  13. My. T is fairly large rose hair. I believe a female due to her size. She just molted about a week ago. I’m starting to get worried due to she hasn’t eaten in a few weeks. I tried to feed her tonight due to I finally saw her start to be active. But she has no interest what so ever. She is the calmest T ever I tried to tong feed her due to that is what the pet store told me to do… And I should be slightly concerned about the length of time 😦

    Worried about her.
    I left the cricket in and will remove in a few if she has not eaten him. Even when she is 100% she is a slow poke.

    Could she be dying of old age???? HELP 😦

    Like

    • Hi, Kitty.

      I honestly wouldn’t worry at all! What size is she approximately? My 6″ female (I’ve had her for over 19 years) just molted, and it was almost a month before she ate again. Even if she had gone a few months, that would have been normal behavior for this species. The larger the tarantula, the longer it takes before they are ready to eat after a molt. They must harden up and get used to their new exoskeletons.

      If she just molted and survived, she’s likely not dying of old age. We estimate my female to be about 25-28 years old or so, and she’s still going strong. Just give her some time and let her recover, and she should start eating again soon.

      Here’s a video of my girl shortly after here molt!

      Hope this helps!

      Tom

      Like

    • Hi, Amiel!

      I found that my LP slings like to burrow and would often bury themselves during promolt. How much substrate is in your enclosure? Did your burrow or just web up a hide for itself? If they don’t have a place to hide, covering themselves with web is quite normal.

      Could you send me a photo of it?

      Tom

      Like

  14. HI , um.. I have a little sling (just started the hobby) and before my sling could catch the cricket it went into my sling’s burrow from a side entrance , should I be worried ? that the cricket could hurt my sling? while in my sling’s burrow ?
    sounds like a stupid question I know.

    Like

    • Hi, Jess. Not a stupid question at all! We’ve all been there.

      What size and species is your sling?

      In most cases, the sling will either kill and eat the cricket or wait outside until the “intruder” has left its home. Unless your tarantula is molting or the cricket is too large for it, it shouldn’t post a threat to your sling.

      Hope that helps!

      Tom

      Like

  15. Hi. We just acquired a rescue chillian rose. Unsure of age and unsure of feeding habits. It’s been about 2 weeks and it’s not eaten. I assume it’s fully grown as it’s quite large. We have tried small locusts and large crickets. Can any one help? I’m also interested to know what t’s are very good eaters and don’t fast for months.

    Like

    • Hi, Jamie!

      That is not abnormal at all; In fact, I would have been more surprised had you told me it DID eat. 🙂 It can take tarantulas several weeks to settle in and eat after being rehoused. And, I’m sure that you’ve read the G. porteri/roseas (the species referred to as “Chilean rose”) are infamous for fasting for months at a time. It’s quite common for this T to take several months off from eating. When they do this, the best thing you can do is make sure they have water and try them with a prey item every couple weeks or so. They can go a loooooong time without eating, so they aren’t in any danger.

      Some great eating tarantulas that are okay for those new to the hobby are L. parahybana (“Salmon bird eater”). C. cyaneopubescens (“Greenbottle Blue or GBB”) and P. cancerides (Haitian Brown). Just know that many of the species that eat great are also a bit more high-strung.

      Like

  16. Hi there Tom try to leave a comment earlier but i don’t know if it has been posted. In case it haven’t just wanted to ask if i have to already put a water disk on my T’s their just juvenile i think about 1-2 inch in size… I’m a newbie in this hobby and started out with a B. albicep and C marshalli… i have ask some people about it and they told me that its not yet necessary since they can get all the fluids they need on their food but others say its needed.. so upon searching i found this interesting website so from now on i will be visiting this site more often… a great website for beginners like me =) tnx in advance…

    Like

    • Hello there! I usually give water dishes to my slings starting at about 1″. I use the little caps you get from bottled water. It’s true that many tarantulas get all of the moisture they need from prey (especially your C. marshalli, as it’s an arid species), but I have seen many of mine drink, so I give them the option. It definitely doesn’t hurt to give them one, especially because slings are more prone to dehydration.

      I hope that helps!

      Tom

      Like

  17. Hi there tom i just wanna ask when will a T resume eating after a molt? i have my Fireleg molted just yesterday and i really dont have any idea when to resume feeding i have read some stuff saying its dangerous to feed a T that had just molted and need a few more days to resume feeding.
    So when will I resume feeding? tnx in advance and great website by the way very very usefull.
    and by the way my fireleg is about 4 inch just bought it 2 weeks ago and its her first molting in my care =)

    Like

    • If you got my original reply, my apologies. It looks as if it didn’t send.

      For a T that size, I would wait at least a week and probably closer to two weeks. They have to harden up after a molt (especially their fangs) and larger specimens take longer to do this. You want to give them enough time to do this.

      Congrats on having your first molt!

      Tom

      Like

  18. hello there tom!!!
    just wanna ask when is the right time to feed a newly molted T. my fireleg just molted yesterday and i don’t have any idea when to offer a meal to her.. do i have to wait for a couple of days or weeks?
    tnx in advance.. by the way I’m June from Philippines and its nice having your website full of info and guides it helps me a lot tnx….

    Like

    • Hi, June!

      Apparently, you’re a Final Fantasy fan? 🙂

      A tarantula that size might not be ready to eat again for a couple weeks. I would give it at least 7 days or so before offering her food. If she doesn’t take it in a day, take it out and try again in a couple more days.

      Thanks so much for the kind words! I’m so glad that you’re finding this stuff helpful. 🙂

      Let me know if you have any other questions!

      Tom

      Like

      • Yeah Final Fantasy fanatic =)
        Tnx for the advice and yes this site of yours is very useful i have already told my friends about this site.
        Tnx again and God bless!!
        and expect a lot of question from me in the future hope you don’t mind it LOL!!! =)
        Again Thank you very much…

        Like

    • Although it’s possible for a female to lay eggs in a tarantula’s cage, I honestly haven’t heard of it happening often at all. I think that it’s a very rare occurrence, and something I wouldn’t worry too much about. I’ve probably fed out thousands of crickets and have never had it happen yet (knock on wood!). Hope that helps!

      Like

    • Hi, there!

      It depends on the size of it. When mine were slings, I feed them about 3 times a week. As juveniles, it was twice a week and as young adults, they get fed one large dubia roach once a week. My large 9″ male gets one hissing cockroach a week. Hope that helps!

      Like

  19. Hi, i recently purchased an Australian Bird Eating spider and i had a few questions i was hoping you could help me with.
    1. When you mention to just drop the prey in, is it perfectly ok to just leave it like that overnight? how will i know if the spider has consumed it or if the cricket is just hiding?
    2. how often should i spray the enclosure with water to keep it humid?

    Thank you for taking your time to respond 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Hi, i recently purchased a juvenile Australian Bird Eating spider and i had a few questions i was hoping you could help me with.
    1. When you mention to just drop the prey in, is it perfectly ok to just leave it like that overnight? how will i know if the spider has consumed it or if the cricket is just hiding?
    2. how often should i spray the enclosure with water to keep it humid?
    3. should i be worried that it constantly climbs the glass on the side of the enclosure?
    Thank you for taking your time to respond 🙂

    Like

    • Hi, Michael.

      I LOVE that species. I’m assuming that it’s the Phlogius crassipes, or some type Phlogius. I have a mature male, two slings, and a juvenile and they are favorites in my collection

      Okay, enough gushing over Australian tarantulas…on to your questions.

      1) I will drop prey in and leave it overnight. If it’s still there the next day, I’ll pluck it out. Honestly, the only reason you want to take them out is because if the T isn’t eating, then it could be in premolt. And, if it molts while the cricket is in there, the cricket can harm it.

      2) If you don’t mind me asking, how are you keeping it? How is it set up? I keep mine in deep, moist substrate with a large water dish, so I don’t have to worry about spraying. When I need to moisten things up a bit (once a month or so) I have a bottle that I’ve poked holes in the lid to sprinkle water in and “make it rain.” This keeps the substrate moist longer.

      Here’s a husbandry video I did on mine (it’s a mature male, so it likely looks a bit different than yours).

      3. This leads back to how you’re keeping it. If you just got the spider, this is totally normal behavior. It can take them a few months to acclimate to their new homes. If you give it deep substrate, it should eventually burrow. Despite digging burrows, mine were out quite a bit. If it doesn’t have the room to burrow, it’s going to feel a bit less secure in its surroundings.

      I hope that helps. Please let me know if you have any other questions!

      – Tom

      Like

      • Thanks for the reply,

        Being a juvenile i figured one small cricket will do him for his size so i popped one in yesterday because i didn’t know when he had last been fed and i forgot to ask when i purchased him. I can no longer find the cricket in there at all today so i can only imagine that he has fallen prey to the phlogius. I know that the species is mostly nocturnal and i stay up quite late during nights and i haven’t seen him wander or hunt the cricket, could it be that the cricket wandered under his tree bark and became food? I keep a small shallow lid as a water dish as he is only small at the moment and i have seen him drink from it so i am glad about that. The substrate is about 1inch deep which i feel could be deeper which is why i purchased the external hide so he has cover. Does this species prefer to burrow or do they prefer caves that i can provide? He stays under the bark majority of the time, i also noticed that he hasn’t climbed the glass today and i feel this is because i was over careful with the substrate and tried to get it very moist so the moss could hold plenty of water. I read that this could have made him try to move away and thus resulting in him climbing the glass, does that sound about right to you?
        I also have a question of how do i go about moving him if i were to add more substrate? i don’t want him to get close enough to strike at my finger if at all possible.
        thank you 😀

        Like

      • Hello!

        This species is quite secretive at times and will build it’s own burrow if given enough substrate. As a fossorial tarantula, it needs enough room to dig, and it may not adapt well to a hide.

        I currently have my two slings on about 3″, and that male in the video has about 7″. My juvenile has around 5″ or so. Mine were started with a piece of cork bark with a stater burrow beneath. All dug right to the bottoms of their enclosures and created dens. Once they feel more secure, you’ll see them eat more and hang out where you can see them more. 🙂

        Mine are all kept a bit moist, so the moist substrate shouldn’t bother him; that’s usually for arid species. It might just be settling in. I would keep one side moist and one dry to give it a choice. I would definitely packed down some more substrate for him as well.

        The easiest way to move him would be to place a plastic cup that you can see through over him, then carefully slide a piece of cardboard underneath. You can then pick him up and move him with little fuss. I can send you a link to videos demonstrating this?

        Hope this helps…let me know if you have any other questions!

        Tom

        Like

      • Ok, so even tho he has a hide he will still want to dig further down, i will need to get a lot more substrate for him then it would seem because i think is only a 2cm layer beneath him while in the hide and i am sure he wouldn’t like that. I would like to somehow take a picture and get your thoughts on the enclosure so you have an idea of how its set up. He has continued to climb the enclosure but i am expecting him to do that for a few weeks into the future, i appreciate you taking the time to reply.

        Like

  21. Hello!

    Thank you so much for this wonderful website. I really learned a lot.

    I just want to know if my chaco golden knee is a male or a female. Because the seller told me its a fem.

    Like

  22. Hey Tom!

    Great website you have here, it was very helpful getting while preparing for my first sling, an A. Versicolor. It has adapted well, but last week it stopped eating and i try every couple days to feed it but it still refuses. I know fasting is a sign of pre-molt, but he is still as active as usual so i have been confused. Thoughts? Also, the top part of the cage dries out quicker than the substrate and he hides out up top so I’m spraying 3 times a week, is this OK?

    Thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi, Henry!

      Thanks so much!

      What size is the sling? How long had it been eating for before it stopped. They can still be active for the first part of premolt, although they usually become a bit more secretive.

      Is the substrate wet? What type of enclosure are you keeping her in?

      This is a species that has been known to die if the enclosure becomes too moist and stuff (this might not be an issue, but I’ll mention it just in case!).

      Tom

      Like

      • You are welcome!
        It is just under 1″, still pretty young. It had been eating for about 3 weeks before it stopped. And okay thanks, did not know that.
        The substrate is not wet, it is usually damp when i feel it and it is in a arboreal spidering cage from jamie’s tarantulas, (the same place i received the sling from).
        I know how sensitive they can be with the humidity and all so thats why i wanted to inquire.
        Thanks so much for the help!

        Liked by 1 person

      • If it’s under an inch and it’s been eating for 3 weeks, I would anticipate a molt soon. At that size, mine molted about every 4-6 weeks or so.

        Personally, if the substrate is moist, I would just dribble/spray a little water on the webbing once a week. When I kept mine (it was in a Jamie’s enclosure as well), I kept the sub mostly dry with a moist corner. I would then use an eyedropper or little sprayer to drip some water on the webbing twice a week if it wanted a drink.

        I hope that helps! Please let me know if you have any other questions (or when he molts!) 🙂

        Tom

        Like

  23. Okay! I will try to leave it be for now then and hopefully it will molt soon.
    And okay good thinking, thanks a bunch this was very helpful. I will be in touch in the future!

    Henry

    Like

    • Another thing to consider is the humidity where you live. For example, I’m in Connecticut, and it’s about 95% humidity outside at the moment. That means if I spray my Ts, I’m REALLY jacking up the humidity in their enclosures. In the winter when the furnace is running, the air gets VERY dry, so I’m extra diligent when providing moisture. Just something to think about. 🙂

      Good luck!

      Like

  24. I am at a loss. My rose hair (I think its a Rose Hair but I got it at PetSmart) hasn’t eaten since her molt and is shriveling up. I have tried to put her in the ICU but later read that was not good for an arid T. I tried to hand water and Im not sure what I am doing. One fact is that she molted not long ago and I moved a week later to a much higher elevation. Any help is needed.

    Like

    • Hi. Leah.

      A couple questions to start off: First, how long have you had her? Has she eaten since you acquired her? Second, about how large is she?

      If she’s a larger specimen, it may be several weeks before she’s ready to eat again. The last time my rose hair molted, I believe it was close to a month before she had her first meal. Also, did you move her into a new enclosure or just a new spot in the room?

      Are you sure that she’s shriveling? Does her abdomen look deflated?

      Could you possibly send a picture to me through email or Facebook?

      All the best,

      Tom

      Like

  25. My mexican fireleg is not eating much i give him a large dragon fly. Then they eat agian i drop 1 large dragon fly again then they eat it. And now i giving my T a super worm. But they dont it eat what can i do? ;(

    Like

    • Hi, Patrick!

      What size is your fireleg? It’s very possible that after eating two very large meals, it’s full for the time being. Also, it might not take the super worms because it’s not used to them.

      How big is the abdomen?

      Hope that helps!

      Tom

      Like

  26. Hi there,
    I just bought adult Brachypelma vagans last week and she does not eat. Is it possible that she doesn’t eat because of the rehouse or is something wrong with her? Everytime I give her a locust she just follows it around but never tries to kill it.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Hello!

      It’s quite possible that she just hasn’t settled in yet. Give her some time to adjust to her new home, and you may have better luck.

      It’s also possible that she’s in premolt, as they won’t eat then. Does her abdomen look very plump?

      Tom

      Like

      • Hi there,
        no, not really. Also her bald spot on her abdomen is still pink and I believe it darkens before molting, right? She is also quite aggresive, everytime I want to change her water and I scoop her with a brush, she attacks it with her fangs right away, instead of just kicking the hair.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Hello! What size is she? What size is the prey item compared to her? Sometimes if the prey offered is too large, they can become spooked and not feed.

        Some specimens are more defensive than others. Perhaps if she gets some time to settle in, she’ll calm down.

        Like

  27. She is 7 cm in body (2,75 inch), the locust is like 3-4 cm. I tried zophobas worm and a roach with same results, I will just leaver her alone for a week or two and try again later.
    Thanks for your replies, much appreciated.
    BTW: I love your website, very useful information for a novice like me.
    Have a nice day. 🙂

    Like

    • Hi, there! Unfortunately, sometimes certain tarantulas will refuse some food items. I have tarantulas that will not eat roaches or meal worms, but have no problem eating crickets. Have you tried dropping the worm right in front of it? Does it just walk away from the worm?

      Like

    • Hi, Kim. How long have you had her for? What kind of pokie is she? Can you email me a photo of her and the setup? My pokies,especially the slings, are usually voracious eater who only refuse food when in premolt. Perhaps this is the case?

      Tom

      Like

  28. Hi, I have a grammostola rosea I believe to be a female. She’s off her food and only taking water.
    She has started to walk around as if drunk, falling etc.
    Crickets she kills but does not eat.
    Her abdomen has shrunk and I’m concerned.
    What can I do, I’ve put in a fat worm yet not interested.
    Can I put her in a smaller container with the food to make her eat?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi, Steven! Can you possibly email me a photo of her (tomsbigspiders@outlook.com)? How long have you had her for? This species is notorious for fasting for months on end. Unfortunately, there is no way to make her eat. They’ll start eating again when they are ready.

      Like

  29. Hi tom, 1 more favour, If my T leg injured only the edge of the foot because i wrongly close the container and not seeing my T foot still stuck at the top of the container.. Now my T unable to climb anymore.. Can my T leg recover back as usual ? 😦

    Like

    • Hi, Shane! You’re definitely not the first person to accidentally do this. It happens quite a bit. Which species is it again? Ts can lose legs and grow them back with no issues. It’s actually quite fascinating to watch the leg grow fully back after a couple of molts (it will be shorter after the first molt). Your T should be fine. 🙂

      Like

  30. Hi, I have a Red Knee Tarantula. I have had it for about seventeen years. I had just moved and left the aquarium on the floor in my closet. I forgot that I do not lock the front of the closure and came home to find that my two little dogs had knocked it over and all the substrate was out on the floor and my Tarantula was nowhere to be found. I found it later hiding and placed it back in the aquarium. It seemed fine, I fed it a few days later. Now it’s been about three weeks and this morning it seemed sluggish and barely moved, even when I touched it. Two of it’s legs were starting to curl. I am very upset, I feel like the stress of the incident and the traveling has ended it’s life. Am I going to come home to a dead Tarantula? Has it reached the end of it’s life? I feel terrible about this.

    Like

    • Hi, Lori! First off, I’m so sorry to hear about this. I have four large dogs, and I’ve had a couple close calls with my Ts as well. Ugh.

      Did she continue to eat after you put her back in her enclosure? If so, that’s a very good sign. It could be possible that she was injured from the accident; did you examine her at all before putting her in the tank?

      Tom

      Like

  31. Hi, i have recently purchased Psalmopoeus irminias sling about 1cm LS…

    I set up an arboreal setup using a plastic jar and i put moist cocopeat as substrate & a piece of bark in it…
    The T decides to stay right at the base of the bark and it seems to dig a hole and stay in it with only a pair of its fore legs visible at the mouth of the den (is it normal for irminias sling?)

    This evening i fed it with pinhead cricket and left it for few minutes…
    After i got back, the cricket was gone. I tried to carefully searched the surface of the substrate (cricket is brown and so is the color of cocopeat and it made a hard time to search for it) and I didn’t find it everywhere…

    But i couldn’t check inside of its burrow (too dark, and i’m afraid it might startle the sling if i put flashlight on it), but it seems the sling was still calmly staying inside its den with only a pair of legs visible.
    Does this mean the T already ate the cricket?
    Got a bit worried here that if the sling didn’t eat the cricket and it stayed inside the burrow with the T but i couldn’t see it.
    Do you think i should worry?

    *i don’t know if it’s in premolt, it just arrived at home 2 days ago

    Thanks

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi, Even! I’m actually working on a care article for the P. irminia as we speak. It’s very normal for them to do some burrowing as slings. I keep four Psalmopoeus species, and they all dug as slings. They are very shy at that size. I would guess that If you can’t find the cricket, the sling ate it. They are VERY good eaters. Generally, if they don’t eat a cricket, they will either kill it or slap it out of their burrow. I would just keep a lookout for the cricket. If it doesn’t reappear, it was probably eaten.

      I hope that helps!

      Tom

      Liked by 1 person

  32. Tom, thanks for the great website.
    I’m started a unit in my middle school science class and thought since I was focusing on spiders, as I teach Biodiversity, what better way to motivate kids than to have a tarantula for them to look at in during the unit.
    So, I am purchasing a 2-2 1/2″ Curly Hair and getting the adult enclosure with the locking lid, for obvious reasons. Question about feeding…the spider is currenly eating medium B. Lateralis, but I’m thinking I’m going for the dubia and hoping it will eat those.
    My question is how do you go about keeping the dubia colony? Feeding and housings and such?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hello, Jeffrey!

      Thanks so much for the kind words!

      It’s funny, I’m asking around now to see if I can get a tarantula in my classroom. My kids this year are particularly interested, so I figure it’s time. That said, I’m not a science teacher, and my principal is not a fan of spiders, so we’ll see…

      The dubia colonies are VERY simple to start and keep. You can usually find folks selling starter colonies with 25-50 roaches online, and they eat darn near anything. Here’s a link to the post I did about my colony:

      https://tomsbigspiders.wordpress.com/2014/07/13/custom-dubia-roach-enclosure-and-care/

      Just know that these guys are AMAZING at playing dead when a spider approaches, and they can burrow and hide when the coast is clear.

      Let me know if you have any other questions!

      All the best,

      Tom

      Like

  33. I read somewhere that there would be leftovers after eating and that they should be removed from the enclosure or it could cause bacteria to build up. Couple questions…feeding my sling such a small b lateralis, which I can barely see before he gobbled on it, how can I find any left overs? Also, if my larger T, 2″ Curly Hair ate in his hide (Under a cork hollow) do I go searching in there for it if I can’t find it somewhere else, or will this just disturb him more?

    Thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yup, those leftovers are called “boluses”. They are usually small, whitish, and “crusty” looking. For a sling that size, you will have a very difficult time finding one. Definitely don’t worry about finding them with slings.

      And most Ts will drag their boluses out of their burrows after they eat, so you should never have to go searching. That would be much too disruptive. Check around the water dish or the corners of the enclosure for the remains. If you shoot me an email, I can send you a photo of what to look for.

      All the best!

      Tom

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s